Separating Web Design Content From Presentation

Separating Web Design content from presentation encourages developers to create a useful framework for web development, making them more pleasant for users. Technologies such as PHP, ASP and CGI have allowed developers to form dynamic web pages, creating new applications using the concept as foundation.

In the last few years, the internet community has tried to create a standard set for design. This has led to the introduction of Cascading Style Sheets or CSS.

CSS permits developer to define a single style for every element of HTML tag. This is very similar to the method utilized in olden days when every HTML tag was laced with a variable which defined their style. The major factor of difference is that it allows CSS to define a style for every tag element.

Conventional Methods

The CSS method is very similar to the process used by developers in olden days when a variable was attached to every HTML tag, indicating their style. A major factor of difference was that they could easily be interpreted by many existing web design browsers, while the dynamic page engine took care of interpretation.

ISO or Internet Standards Organization have encouraged CSS use by enhancing their ability to control the look and feel of web design pages. Additional style options have also been incorporated into CSS specifications, which are yet to get added to HTML description language.

Modifications

The move has forced developers to use CSS for highly attractive design pages, which also support the principles of content separation. Unfortunately, CSS didn’t easily find its way into the mainstream internet connection for lack of compatibility with major web browsers.

Separating design content from presentation not only deals with styling aspects, but also with the issue of browser compatibility. The It community now seeks standard solution for easy content management.

“How To Resolve Powerful Opposition By Reading Body Language” – Negotiation Tip of the Week

He observed the opposing member’s body language and noted a rise in their opposition. He thought – this intervention is not going well. I’ll display a stronger resolve through my body language when I speak. And that will enhance my words.

Even those not astute at reading body language become swayed by their gestures. Some they see, and others they miss – their subconsciousness may capture the latter. That may lead to someone thinking, ‘I had a hunch or a feeling about that. But I didn’t know what it meant.’ In reality, that was their intuition summoning their consciousness. When one notices the slight gesture of someone biting their lips, hands on hips, or an intense glare, those gestures convey a message.

You can use the following information about reading body language to resolve opposition to your position.

Identify Alliances:

Always know who’s aligned with whom before you attempt an intervention. Without that insight, you don’t know who might be your real friend or foe. That’s important because, without that knowledge, you can’t confront the real force that opposes you. Thus, there may be a stronger force with superior powers that go unaddressed. And that could leave you going in circles wondering why you’re not advancing.

To identify possible factions aligned against you, consider planting misinformation about one group in the other. And note what that information does within those units. In particular, observe what the info does per new alliances the opposition forms. You can glean additional insight by visually inspecting the coalitions when you’re in the same environment. Do that by noting who congregates with whom and any other nonverbal exchanges that occur. You’re looking for the slightest of shifts to increase your advantage. If the forces are still committed to one another as before, that might indicate the information was insufficient for its purpose. It could also imply that there’s a stronger alliance than you’d imagined. And an FYI, this tactic is served better if you have a confidant within your targets midst place the information.

While some might consider this maneuver to be underhanded, depending on the threat confronting you, it may be well warranted – even if some revile you. Just be mindful that those with the most to lose will be the ones that contest you the most. Once uncovered, they’ll be the real opponents challenging your position.

Understanding One Important Body Language Queue:

To identify alliances through body language, observe gestures passed between members of the opposition. Such gestures as one member placing a hand on the shoulder of another while talking can silently indicate that he’s seeking support from that person. You can also observe someone searching for assistance when a person speaks, and someone from his group places a hand on his shoulder. Since the prior gesture can also be a form of control (i.e., let’s not go that far), take note of when it occurs and who initiates the action. If it’s a “let’s not go that far” intent, the person displaying the gesture may be a leader behind the scenes or someone that you can use later to control the person speaking. Using a veiled leader in that capacity would allow you to use the hidden powers of an influencer.

Signs of Escalation:

Some body language gestures are like canaries in a coal mine – they foretell pending danger.

  • Face-To-Face

You can sense some body language gestures before the display becomes altered. Thus, those displays reflect the emotional state of that individual at that moment. Those signals are called micro-expressions.

There are other signs to observe, such as hand flexing, the hand becoming a fist, displaying a grimacing demeanor while moving closer to you, and increasing the rate of speech. Such indicators can be the signal of emotional elevation, which can lead to hostile escalations.

It’s important to note such signals because they can indicate a change in the mental temperature. And that could put you in a worse position – which can lead you and them to become unreceptive to logical thinking.

  • On Phone

When speaking on the phone, listen for deep sighing, the deliberation of words, and the pace of speech of the person with whom you’re talking. As someone’s ire becomes heightened, you’ll hear the rise of it through those nonverbal queues. Note if you’re displaying such gestures too. Because regardless of who commits those actions, it’s an opportunity for you to shift the conversation in a direction that suits your purpose.

Reflection:

You can note the effectiveness of your efforts by the shifting positions your opponents adopt. Note the shift verbally and physically when in person. That’ll indicate their attempts to seek an opening they can exploit. Which means they’re on the defense.

Thus, when intervening in situations, depending on the value of the outcome, do so with vigor – don’t dither. Dithering can waste your time and hamper your position. And that’s something you can’t afford. Use the body language signs mentioned before, during, and after an intervention. They’ll put you in a more powerful position… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!

Listen to Greg’s podcast at https://anchor.fm/themasternegotiator

After reading this article, what are you thinking? I’d like to know. Reach me at [email protected]

Creating Effective Video Presentations

Video presentations are important to get right. Your aim should be to keep your viewers watching your video rather than clicking away part way through. Whilst there will always be people who don’t watch the entire video, you’ll be able to tell from your stats how long people watch for and can tweak your newer videos to help reduce the number of people who click away.

Grab attention fast

You know from the videos you watch that you need to get people’s attention fast. Our attention spans seem to be dropping by the minute and if we don’t get what we thought we’d clicked on, we’ll click the back button fast.

That means you can’t spend the first minute or two of your video waffling and generally beating around the bush. You need to have a brief introduction – I’ll typically say something like “Hi, this video is about” and then whatever the title of the video was.

Nothing more.

No long introductions – the equivalent of the polite sales call introductions of “how are you today” that you immediately recognise as being from someone who’s never spoken to you before in your life.

Make it personal

The closer you can get your video to being like a one-on-one conversation you’re having with a friend, the better.

This really is important!

Your personality will come across when you do this. Which means that you’ll either attract or repel people watching your video.

Don’t take that personally – we can’t be all things to all people, it’s just not possible.

Instead, you’ll get people who like your style and let you know that by subscribing to your YouTube channel, even if you don’t remind them that’s an option.

You may even get comments and YouTube allows you to moderate those. It also does quite a good job of filtering out the spam that pervades the internet.

Keep to the point

Videos aren’t the place to go off on a tangent.

Personally, I like to work from a slide show or at the very least a bullet pointed list.

That works for me and makes sure that I keep close to the original point I promised to talk about.

Don’t cover too much

It’s better to split your presentations into several shorter videos rather than trying to create an epic that covers everything.

This has two main advantages:

  • It works with short attention spans
  • It gives you more chances to appear in the search results

Most search results tend to drill down – people are getting wise to the fact that Google is relatively clueless if you only give it one or two words to work with and are using more words for their searches, often from the list of suggestions that show up as soon as you start typing.

Use the suggestions that show up as the basis for your titles.

Then answer the question that’s been raised in the search query.

Nothing else – just stick to the topic.

Of course, if you’ve promised 5 tips then you need to give 5 tips. That should go without saying – although without an editor overseeing you, it’s not uncommon for things to go astray even with something as basic as that.

I’ve done it on articles before now and been picked up by the editorial process.

But the chances are that you’ll be writer, presenter and producer of your video. So you need to be alert for that potential problem.